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  • 07 Jul 2020 3:55 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Challenges of Global Regulatory Mandates

    If your brand’s goals include entering more than one global market and are interested in doing it correctly, you are in for a series of challenges to overcome.

    Here are several things to consider:

    • Variations in ingredient nomenclature - INCI (International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients): It sounds like a great idea to standardize the way cosmetic ingredients are listed all over the globe, but it isn’t as simple when it comes to the way it really works. EU wants allergens listed, Canada doesn’t like “Water (Aqua)”, prefers “Water”. Some botanicals include their common names, others don’t. This still goes back and forth every so often.
    • Globally-accepted ingredients with various level of use restrictions and applications (rinse-off products vs leave-on for example). Depending on the how a formula is categorized and its function, allowable ingredient levels vary amongst different markets. Ingredient categories that seem to trigger include AHAs, surfactants and preservatives. Additionally, the Hot List (prohibited ingredients) between US, Canada and the EU shows a huge disparity, further complicating and limiting the creation of globally-accepted formulas.
    • Disparity of cosmetic marketing phrases are extremely varied, such as: you cannot say “free of” anything in EU, Canada doesn’t like the word “blemish”. These are just a couple of examples of what you can or cannot say.
    • Marketing (Social Media) – how do you create a uniform message that complies globally? A brand’s story can get diluted very quickly when it must create different stories for fit each market’s specific set of rules. But you really must investigate each market guideline carefully.
    • Intellectual property – global protection is not possible so enter with caution. In order to secure intellectual property for “BRAND X”, one must do it for each country or region separately. This comes at a potentially very high expense, not to mention that if the mark is taken by only one country, the owner must either abandon that market, use a different name in that market, or move forward without a mark and risk having the mark owner take action against him/her.
    • All this leads to the need for market-specific packaging.

    Having country-specific packaging and/or formulas would be ideal, but how practical is this really? Ideally, there would be a uniform set of regulations and laws globally and covering all aspects of our industry - made clear, simple, and reasonable to execute. It’s a stretch and it may be viewed as a naive wish, but the current way is not the most desired path. The easiest way to go about it is to choose a single market or a region with similar rules and grow the brand there before considering a wider expansion.



    By Toni Abbruzzese

  • 18 Apr 2020 11:50 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    AAL - Hand Sanitizer Analysis & COVID-19 Swab Testing

    We are currently facing a challenging time in which the "Coronavirus" is the dominating topic. We are aware of the increased demands for the manufacturing of health protection products and have great respect for the task of ensuring the continuing supply of these products. Adamson Analytical offers the analysis necessary to move forward with production and some of these analyses can be completed within the same day. With the increased demand for Hand Sanitizers, we have put together the following Information on Time Kill studies which are necessary for proving the efficacy of the product.

    Due to the increasing need to ensure the safety of everyone during this time, Adamson Analytical Laboratories has expanded our capabilities to Include COVID-19 Surface Swab Testing. More Information on these analyses is listed below. Feel free to also reach out to Jackie Sirois at jackie.sirois@tentamus.com for any additional questions.

    Information on "Time-Kill Test"

    Products with antimicrobial properties like disinfectants and sanitizers should be tested for their antimicrobial activities. The ASTM standard method E2315-16 is used to assess the in vitro reduction of a microbial population of test organisms after exposure to a test material. In this test the main parameters that should be varied are the selected microbiological organisms which should be killed, and the exposure time of the product to the microorganisms. The actual number of colonies of living microorganisms remaining after the exposure are then plated on an appropriate agar and then counted after the prescribed incubation period.

    It is also strongly recommended that the time kill study is paired with a Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) or Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) study as well. These studies help to assess the lowest concentration of an antimicrobial product to kill or inhibit the growth of a specified organism respectively.

    The following organisms can be used as representative markers for assessing antimicrobial properties and is recommended for ingredients already classified as GRAS/GRAE (Generally recognized as safe and effective):

    Please note that additional organisms can be ordered and included in the study upon request.


    COVID-19 Surface Swab Test


    Beginning Wednesday April 8, 2020, we are offering surface swab testing of critical objects for the Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2).

    We provide you with suitable swabs, which you can then use to swab the surfaces of objects including but not limited to:

    ·       Products (Food, Supplies, etc.)

    ·       Mobile phones

    ·       Door handles

    ·       Light Switches

    ·       Handrails

    ·       Keyboards

    ·       Shopping carts

    ·       And many more

    These samples will be analyzed in our laboratories by RT-PCR.

    With the order, you will receive a COMPLETE swabbing kit that includes everything you need to get started. Just swab your critical areas according to the instructions and seal the vial. We take care of the rest!

    Some more specific questions based on frequently asked question will be discussed following.

    The analysis is performed using the protocol (“Real-time RT-PCR assays for the detection of SARS-CoV-2”) listed by the WHO.

    The result of the detection of coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 / swab (recommended area of 25cm² or 2 in. x 2 in.) RT-PCR Result are expressed as: positive/negative. In the case of positive detection, the test report includes a statement that RNA from coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has been detected.

    The limit of detection of the test system shows 5 -7 RNA copies/µl In tests on surfaces, positive results have been demonstrated with swabs on approx. 10,000 bacteriophages/25cm². (for safety reasons bacteriophages are used as test organisms in the laboratory). This is realistically achievable in a coughing outbreak of an infected person.

    No uncertainty of measurement can be determined for qualitative results. Nevertheless, the specificity for the tested microorganisms is 100% - so there are no other viruses that gives the same result.


    Please feel free to contact us with any questions or requests for quotations - we are happy to support your business!


    Adamson Analytical Laboratories Inc.
    220 Crouse Drive, Corona, CA 92879
    Office: (951) 549-9657  


  • 02 Jan 2020 5:36 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)
    “Each generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one that went before it, and wiser than the one that comes after it” George OrwelI once said.  This holds true as different generations attempt to gain a better understanding of the other, while harboring a preconceived bias.  Let’s take a deeper look into the two newest generations. 

    The term "Millennial" is a buzz word and has been a hot topic for a few years. There's many articles written about Millennials with many people trying to dissect this generation. Millennials are classified as people born between 1981 and 1996. Well, there's a new generation entering as a consumer and while they posse similar qualities to Millennials, their buying behavior varies. 

    Generation Z consist of people born in the mid 1990's through the early 2000's.  According to Forbes, they make up 25% of the U.S. population, surpassing both Baby Boomers and Millennials.

    Spending Habits

    Millennial shoppers in the U.S. spend $600 billion each year, with an average yearly expenditure of $47,112.1

    Generation Z shoppers in the U.S. have $200 billion in spending power, including the influence they have over their parents and their household shopping.2  By 2020 they are expected to account for 40% of all U.S. consumers.4  Generation Z consumers tend to lack brand loyalty with 52% of Gen Zer's willing to switch to a different brand if quality becomes an issue.2

    Digitalization of Shopping

    Digital strategies for companies are important for both generations.  Gen Zers are overconnected to digital since they have grown up always having the internet and access to purchasing products and services virtually. 

    Millennials grew up during the rise of the internet and were early adopters to digital, social media and purchasing products online.  Millennials are more likely to purchase a product if they have read a product review or testimony first. Since both generations have adopted a strong digital competency, it's important for companies to have a mobile and social media strategy to connect with this group of consumers.  They want to be able to access

    product information, product reviews and connect with brands via mobile devices.  In addition, simplifying the buying experience is a good way to connect with both generations.  They are interested in streamlining purchases via mobile devices or apps, whether it be in-store or online. 

    Impact on Cosmetics

    Millennial women buying habits have helped to shape the cosmetic industry.  They created a need for niche products and helped drive the way products are offered to consumers.3 Long gone the days of only purchasing from the drug store or the cosmetic counter at a department store.  These consumers are now utilizing subscription-based services to try different products, they are shopping at cosmetic retail stores to purchase a diverse mix of products at once and they're purchasing online to streamline the shopping process.  

    Women Gen Zers are known to spend the most money on beauty products and are more willing to buy high quality products.2 In addition to purchasing online, this generation has sought purchasing cosmetics from specialty brick and mortar retailers such as Sephora and Ulta.  They are driving the need for high quality prestige products and are well versed in ingredients, due to being able to instantly conduct research via the web.

    In addition, social media, bloggers, influencers and YouTube have greatly impacted the way both generations purchase cosmetics. 

    References
    1.     Law, L. (2019). 45 Statistics on Millennial Spending Habits in 2019
    2.     Heller, L. (2015). Move Over Millennials, Generation Z Is In Charge
    3.     Swain-Wilson, S. (2018). 10 ways Gen Zs spend money differently than their Gen X parents
    4.     TABS Group (2015).  TABS Group 2015 U.S. Cosmetics Study Finds Millennial Women Buyers Reign in $13 Billion Dollar Cosmetics Market
    5.     Pearson, B. (2018). 7 Ways Gen Z Shoppers Are Different From All Others -- And None Include Technology

  • 02 Jan 2020 4:50 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    #CleanBeauty

    While searching the #CleanBeauty hashtag on Instagram, I found there’s an astonishing 1.7M post associated with it.  In fact, #CleanBeauty has more post than #OrganicBeauty. Well, what exactly does Clean Beauty mean? The definition of Clean Beauty differs from company to company. However, the consensus is Clean Beauty is the offering of products that are non-toxic, safe and efficacious. This includes offering consumers ingredient transparency and ensuring product safety.  This doesn’t mean that a product is all natural or organic, but rather proven to be safe for use.  According to Statista, this segment of the beauty industry is expected to reach 22 Billion Dollars by 2024 and is growing at a 9% CAGR.1

    Evolution of Transparency

    There’s a popular misconception that the Beauty Industry isn’t regulated.  While industry professionals know this is a fallacy, consumers often believe this misconception. In recent years, this has grown, and consumers have become skeptical of certain ingredients in personal care products.

    Organizations such as EWG, USDA Organic, Whole Foods Market Premium Body Care and NON GMO Project have benefited from this movement by offering their seal of approval on bottles and packaging.2  

    TODAY spoked with a representative from the Personal Care Products Council about questionable ingredients and here’s their response, “Personal care products remain one of the safest product categories regulated by the FDA. The industry takes its responsibility for product safety very seriously. Consumers can continue to use the personal care products they have trusted and relied on for more than 100 years.”2   

    Even still, there’s a heightened consumer demand for transparency and it looks like it’s here to stay.  

    How to Keep Transparency and Integrity

    The Clean Beauty movement isn’t focused on natural ingredients and this is important to keep in mind when developing Clean products. 

    Creating a list and policy of ingredients you aim to not include in formulations and why is key.  Consumers are researching ingredients more now than ever and are calling for increased transparency. 

    Major retailers have adopted their own Clean Beauty standard.  In June 2018, Sephora announced their “Clean at Sephora” seal and their website states, “This seal means formulated without parabens, sulfates SLS and SLES, phthalates, mineral oils, formaldehyde, and more (www.sephora.com). This allows consumers to easily identify clean products in-store and on their website. 

    In March 2019, Target launched their Clean Icon for Personal Care products.  Their icon represents products that are formulated without certain ingredients.  Target’s Clean Icon consist of products formulated without propyl-parabens, butyl-parabens, phthalates, formaldehyde, formaldehyde-donors, nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs), Oxybenzone, SLES, retinyl palmitate, hydroquinone, triclosan, triclocarban, BHA or BHT (www.Target.com).

    It’s safe to say #CleanBeauty is morphing into the new standard of beauty.  It will no longer be an option, but rather an obligation. 

    References
    1.    Statista Research Department (2016). Forecasted market size of the natural and organic beauty industry in 2016 and 2024 (in billion U.S. dollars)
    2.    Thomas, B. (2018). What is 'clean beauty'? Here's what you need to know

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